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Discover All The Ins And Outs Of Personal Bankruptcy

Jun 20

Discover All The Ins And Outs Of Personal Bankruptcy

There are several common misconceptions, which are associated with personal bankruptcy, including that those who file a claim are irresponsible and poor. Realize that you will not be left with nothing, and that you can spring back from this situation. Read this article for some tips on how to deal with personal bankruptcy.

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If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

 

Many people do not know that student loans are not dischargeable debt under bankruptcy laws. Do not go into your bankruptcy thinking that your student loans will be discharged, because only in cases of extreme hardship are they considered. If the job you received from pursuing your degree will never allow you to pay off your debt, you may have a chance, but it is highly unlikely.

 

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you do not need to lose your home, car or other items that you have loans for. If you wish to keep them, however, you must make the payments on a timely basis in order to avoid repossession. If the payments are too much to handle, your bankruptcy attorney may be able to arrange for an evaluation of your loan and negotiate a lower monthly payment. In the case of a home, you may look into a loan modification or refinance to reduce your payment amount.

 

Make sure you have a solid understanding of which debts can be eliminated by bankruptcy, and which ones cannot. Debts like student loans, child support or alimony payments, and taxes, are generally not discharged through bankruptcy. Bankruptcy can help if your wages are being garnished or if you have large unsecured debts, like, credit cards and utility bills.

 

Personal bankruptcy should be a last resort if you're in insolvency. This is due to the fact that it will take years for the bankruptcy to work off your credit report and new law changes make it harder to escape paying the debts off. In other words, you could have bankruptcy on your credit report and still be paying off several of your debts.

 

Don't put off bankruptcy forever. You might be better off filing early rather than juggling your debt for years. If you aren't sure what to do, search for a nonprofit agency that helps consumers navigate bankruptcy. These experts can advise you about the best time to file and can share information about what to expect. Many of these agencies provide classes or workshops about managing credit as well.

 

Last year, those who filed for bankruptcy made $60,000 a year on average. Do not feel like you are completely irresponsible or poor just because you file a claim. Stay informed and speak with a lawyer throughout the entire process. Remember the tips in this article, so that you can come out of the situation, as unscathed as possible.